Paper Prototyping & The Best Geek Comment Ever

I apologize for two tech related posts in a row, but this was just too good to not share.

I was reading an interesting article on a usability design method they call “Paper Prototyping” and the first comment on the article was pure geek gold. In order to truly appreciate it let me give you the context first.

Paper Prototyping is a inexpensive, low-tech method of brainstorming, or of testing the usability of proposed designs for a software interface. Basically, you print out the various aspects of the proposed user interface on paper or cards. You cut out individual elements of the interface design with a pair of scissors if necessary. Then you sit down with the end user and you take the place of the computer. The user then interacts with the paper prototype, and you show them what would happen by laying down different sections to show how the interface changes and displays data.

So here is the golden comment by one Mantari Damacy:

It is like a role playing game, except, for using a computer!

PLAYER: “Okay, I save my file.”

GM: [dice clatters, looks up chart] Okay, you try to save your file, A new window pops up on the screen that indicates a general I/O error, but gives no specific details.

PLAYER: “Oh no! I open up the case, and pull the boot disc off of the IDE controller!”

GM: Okay. [dice clatters] Well, you manage to open up the case without tripping the power, but you’re not familiar with the internal workings of this machine. You can’t locate any IDE drives…

Awesome! I can just imagine a prototyping session ending with the following exchange between the designer and user:

“Sinus supremus!”
“Zero charisma!”
“Sinus supremus!”
“Zero charisma!”

😉

See the original article

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